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Study: Patients Benefit from One-on-One Education and Custom Microsite Before Joint Replacement Surgery

Patients with Pre-Op Education Met Physical Therapy Goals More Quickly

New York, NY—January 17, 2018

A study at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) finds that patients benefit from a one-on-one education session with a physical therapist and access to a web-based microsite prior to joint replacement surgery. They achieved physical therapy goals more quickly after knee or hip replacement compared to patients who did not have the educational session or access to the microsite.

The research was published in the journal Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research (CORR) in the January issue.

"Although many institutions utilize group classes for preoperative education, it has been reported that up to 77% of patients have unfulfilled knowledge expectations with respect to their postoperative function," said lead investigator Rupali Soeters, PT, MEd, PhD, research therapist, HSS Rehabilitation. "Knowledge is power. Supplemental one-on-one education gives joint replacement patients more information about what to expect and can allay some of their concerns."

The educational sessions at HSS are customized to address a patient's specific needs regarding preparation before surgery and what to expect in the hospital, during rehabilitation and throughout recovery. "The difference between a group class and one-on-one education is that the private session gives the patient an opportunity to practice mobility and assistive devices before surgery, discuss concerns and questions in a private environment, and set realistic goals regarding outcomes with the therapist," Dr. Soeters explained.

"After surgery, patients may be dealing with issues such as fatigue, discomfort or anxiety, and it may not be the most opportune time to give them information about the road ahead," said Amar Ranawat, MD, an orthopedic surgeon at HSS and senior study author. "With the face-to-face information session and user-friendly website, they can receive and retain much of the information prior to surgery. Many patients feel more confident knowing what to expect."

Dr. Ranawat adds that researchers are increasingly studying the feasibility of knee and hip replacement as outpatient procedures, and pre-operative education may be one way to prepare patients for earlier discharge.

"The educational session jumpstarts patients’ familiarity with what they are going to experience after surgery, easing some of their fears and apprehensions," said Douglas Padgett, MD, chief of the Adult Reconstruction and Joint Replacement Service at HSS.

In the study, researchers followed 126 patients who underwent knee or hip replacement for osteoarthritis between February and June 2015. All attended a group education class before surgery, the standard of care for patients scheduled for a joint replacement at Hospital for Special Surgery. They were then randomized into two separate groups. The mean age in both groups was 61.

In group one, 63 patients attended the one-on-one education session with a physical therapist about two weeks before surgery, in addition to the group class. After the session, they were given access to a customized website, so they had a wealth of information at their fingertips both before and after surgery. The microsites were highly customized to each procedure, even taking into account which side the surgery was on. Accessible on computers, cell phones and tablets, the sites provided detailed information on precautions after surgery, exercises, ambulation, and activities of daily living through videos, pictures and text.

The control group of 63 patients attended the standard group class and received a booklet about what to expect after joint replacement. They received no further education.

Researchers analyzed how quickly patients achieved physical therapy goals after surgery; how long they were in the hospital; and how they were progressing four to six weeks after joint replacement in terms of pain, stiffness and physical function.

Patients with access to one-on-one education and the microsite achieved physical therapy goals more quickly after surgery. They needed fewer physical therapy sessions in the hospital (3.3 sessions) versus the control group (4.4 sessions). The group receiving one-on-one education also met PT discharge criteria sooner (1.6 days versus 2.7 days for the control group). This included the ability to get in and out of bed, walk with or without an assistive device about 150 feet, and go up and down stairs independently. Researchers found no difference in pain and function six weeks out from surgery.

Hospital length of stay was the same for both groups. "Length of stay is impacted by a number of factors, not just physical therapy," Dr. Padgett noted. "Even if patients reach their physical therapy goals, they must still be deemed medically ready for discharge by the entire patient care team, and all aspects of their medical health are taken into account."

"The study highlights the need for improvement in other aspects of care if we want to decrease length of stay," Dr. Soeters said.

Researchers found that every patient granted access to the microsite used the platform at least once during the surgical process. In addition, 100% of these patients said they would recommend the microsites to all individuals having joint replacement.

At Hospital for Special Surgery, the face-to-face educational program and custom microsites are available to patients having knee replacement, partial knee replacement, hip replacement and shoulder replacement. A special website for ankle replacement is currently in development.

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About HSS | Hospital for Special Surgery
HSS is the world’s leading academic medical center focused on musculoskeletal health. At its core is Hospital for Special Surgery, nationally ranked No. 1 in orthopedics (for the ninth consecutive year) and No. 3 in rheumatology by U.S.News & World Report (2018-2019). Founded in 1863, the Hospital has one of the lowest infection rates in the country and was the first in New York State to receive Magnet Recognition for Excellence in Nursing Service from the American Nurses Credentialing Center four consecutive times. The global standard total knee replacement was developed at HSS in 1969. An affiliate of Weill Cornell Medical College, HSS has a main campus in New York City and facilities in New Jersey, Connecticut and in the Long Island and Westchester County regions of New York State. In 2017 HSS provided care to 135,000 patients and performed more than 32,000 surgical procedures. People from all 50 U.S. states and 80 countries travelled to receive care at HSS. In addition to patient care, HSS leads the field in research, innovation and education. The HSS Research Institute comprises 20 laboratories and 300 staff members focused on leading the advancement of musculoskeletal health through prevention of degeneration, tissue repair and tissue regeneration. The HSS Global Innovation Institute was formed in 2016 to realize the potential of new drugs, therapeutics and devices. The culture of innovation is accelerating at HSS as 130 new idea submissions were made to the Global Innovation Institute in 2017 (almost 3x the submissions in 2015). The HSS Education Institute is the world’s leading provider of education on the topic of musculoskeletal health, with its online learning platform offering more than 600 courses to more than 21,000 medical professional members worldwide. Through HSS Global Ventures, the institution is collaborating with medical centers and other organizations to advance the quality and value of musculoskeletal care and to make world-class HSS care more widely accessible nationally and internationally.

 

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