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A Novel Assessment of Braking Reaction Time Following THA Using a New Fully Interactive Driving Simulator

HSS Journal - Volume 11, Number 2, July 2015

Allison V. Ruel, BA
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY

Yuo-yu Leem, MS
Epidemiology and Biostatistics Core, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY

John Boles, BS
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY

Image - Photo of Geoffrey H. Westrich, MD
Geoffrey H. Westrich, MD
Attending Orthopedic Surgeon, Hospital for Special Surgery
Research Director of Adult Reconstruction and Joint Replacement Service, Hospital for Special Surgery
Image - Photo of Friedrich Boettner, MD
Friedrich Boettner, MD
Associate Attending Orthopaedic Surgeon, Hospital for Special Surgery
Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery, Weill Cornell Medical College
Image - Photo of Edwin P. Su, MD
Edwin P. Su, MD
Associate Attending Orthopedic Surgeon, Hospital for Special Surgery

Abstract

Background
After total hip replacement surgery, patients are eager to resume the activities of daily life, particularly driving. Most surgeons recommend waiting 6 weeks after surgery to resume driving; however, there is no evidence to indicate that patients cannot resume driving earlier.

Questions/Purposes
Our purpose was to evaluate when in the recovery period following THA that patients regain or improve upon their preoperative braking reaction time, allowing them to safely resume driving.

Methods
We measured and compared pre- and postoperative braking reaction times of 90 patients from 3 different surgeons using a Fully Interactive Driving Simulator (Simulator Systems International, Tulsa, OK). We defined a return to safe braking reaction time as a return to a time value that is either equal to or less than the preoperative braking reaction time.

Results
Patients tested at 2 and 3 weeks after surgery had slower braking reaction times than preoperative times by an average of 0.069 and 0.009 s, respectively. At 4 weeks after surgery, however, patients improved their reaction times by 0.035 s (pā€‰=ā€‰0.0398). In addition, at 2, 3, and 4 weeks postoperatively, the results also demonstrated that patient less than 70 years of age recovered faster.

Conclusions
Based upon the results of this study, most patients should be allowed to return to driving 4 weeks following minimally invasive primary total hip arthroplasty.

This article appears in the HSS Journal: Volume 11, Issue 2.
View the full HSS Journal article at springerlink.com.

About the HSS Journal

HSS Journal, an academic peer-reviewed journal published three times a year, February, July and October. The Journal accepts and publishes peer reviewed articles from around the world that contribute to the advancement of the knowledge of musculoskeletal diseases and disorders.

 

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