Tips for Working Out Safely in the Summer Heat


With summer on its way, many won’t let the rising temperatures get in the way of their exercise routines. Dr. Sabrina Strickland, Orthopedic Surgeon, has tips to help you stay safe while keeping fit in the summer heat:

1. Don’t stop working out just because of the heat, but it is a good excuse to take it a bit easy.

2. If you have asthma or other respiratory issues, certainly take a break. Work out inside or skip the hottest days.

3. Bring water, drink it every 20 minutes and start your workout well hydrated.

4. Work out during the coolest hours, early in the morning or late at night.

5. Warning signs to look out for: dizziness, cramping, headache and at the extreme a lack of sweating. These may signify dehydration and possible early heat stroke.

Dr. Sabrina Strickland is an orthopedic surgeon at Hospital for Special Surgery’s Women’s Sports Medicine Center and at the HSS Stamford office, where she treats both male and female patients. Her research has focused on?anterior cruciate ligament injuries in women, as well as rotator cuff repair and shoulder instability.

The information provided in this blog by HSS and our affiliated physicians is for general informational and educational purposes, and should not be considered medical advice for any individual problem you may have. This information is not a substitute for the professional judgment of a qualified health care provider who is familiar with the unique facts about your condition and medical history. You should always consult your health care provider prior to starting any new treatment, or terminating or changing any ongoing treatment. Every post on this blog is the opinion of the author and may not reflect the official position of HSS. Please contact us if we can be helpful in answering any questions or to arrange for a visit or consult.

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  1. Heat stroke can kill or cause damage to the brain and other internal organs. Although heat stroke mainly affects people over age 50, it also takes a toll on healthy young athletes.