Ask the Expert: Scleroderma

9.11 Blog

Dr. Robert Spiera, Rheumatologist and Director of the Vasculitis and Scleroderma Program at the Hospital for Special Surgery, answers readers’ questions on scleroderma.

Q1. Has there been any advancement in the treatment of scleroderma?

There have been a tremendous number of advances in the treatment of scleroderma and its complications. Much of this relates to advances in other areas of medicine relating to organ systems involved by scleroderma.

For example, the use of proton pump inhibitors has made a tremendous difference for the severe GI issues and reflux which plagues many patients with scleroderma. A problem called “scleroderma renal crisis,” which many years ago would invariably result in loss of renal function or even death, now can be treated with a class of blood pressure medications called ACE inhibitors, often with tremendous success. Pulmonary hypertension, which is a life-threatening complication seen in some patients with scleroderma, has benefited from a tremendous number of advances in the treatment of that underlying condition, and this has led to improvement in quality and sometimes even duration of life in many patients with scleroderma. Even advances in areas such as lung and/or heart transplantation have benefited patients with scleroderma. Similarly, there have been a number of blood vessel dilating medications that have been developed and have been recognized as being helpful in patients with scleroderma and Raynaud’s phenomena complicated by digital ulcers. There have also been trials demonstrating that immunosuppressive therapies can be helpful in terms of progression of lung disease in patients with scleroderma and progressive interstitial lung disease.

The question of whether there is a true “disease modifying” drug for scleroderma, however, remains a difficult one, and there are no drugs that have been unequivocally proven in controlled trials to do so. Encouragingly, there are a number of agents of interest looking at a variety of strategies including immunosuppressive strategies with drugs such as Mycophenolate or Cyclophosphamide, antifibrotic therapies with drugs such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and even the development of newer biologics which may hold promise in terms of treating the underlying disease. The scleroderma clinical research community has become much more sophisticated and integrative in our ability to perform the clinical trials necessary to assess these newer medications. Moreover, advances in understanding the basic underlying immune and vascular system abnormalities in scleroderma holds promise for developing newer therapies in the not too distant future.

Q2. What puts you at greater risk of developing scleroderma?

In most patients with scleroderma, there is not necessarily an underlying predisposing risk factor. There are some genetic issues which may be associated with a slightly higher risk for scleroderma, but in general scleroderma does not seem to be a strongly genetically determined disease. A host of environmental exposures have been concerning for the development of scleroderma-like illnesses, but this is relevant in only a minority of patients who ultimately develop scleroderma. Finally, smoking seems to be a risk factor for vasculopathy and worse disease expression in scleroderma, although it is not clear that it increases the risk of scleroderma per se.

Q3. How is scleroderma diagnosed?

The diagnosis of scleroderma is based on clinical features and supported by certain laboratory findings. The overwhelming majority of patients with scleroderma had Raynaud’s phenomena, a condition where upon cold exposure extremities can become whitish, bluish, or ultimately even reddish and uncomfortable. Raynaud’s phenomena, however, is common in the general population. In patients with Raynaud’s phenomena in the context of scleroderma, other findings are usually present, including changes that can be observed by an experienced clinician looking closely at the nail beds, skin changes which generally define scleroderma (the typical “hardened skin” that one would see in scleroderma), and the presence of internal organ issues. There are also blood tests that can help confirm the diagnosis of scleroderma including a positive ANA (antinuclear antibody) which is not necessarily specific for scleroderma but often present in patients with scleroderma, as well as more specific blood tests such as anti-Scl-70, anti-RNA polymerase III, or anti-centromere antibody. Ultimately the diagnosis is a combination of clinical and laboratory features and generally is made by an experienced clinician with some familiarity with scleroderma. A skin biopsy is usually NOT necessary to make the diagnosis.

Q4. What are the causes of scleroderma?

In most patients with scleroderma, the cause is unknown. It has been associated with a syndrome where adulterated L tryptophan resulted in a scleroderma-like illness as well as certain scleroderma-like lung diseases after exposures to certain toxins or chemotherapeutic agents such as bleomycin. Some scleroderma-like illnesses have also been associated with environmental exposures, such as an outbreak of scleroderma-like illness in Spain in people who had ingested a toxic rapeseed oil.

Q5. How can you treat scleroderma?

The treatment of scleroderma is individualized. Patients can present many different types of scleroderma, ranging from scleroderma that only minimally affects the skin to scleroderma that affects a large portion of the skin. In some patients, the skin issue is the major issue and we have used a number of medications to help prevent progression of skin thickening, although none of these medications are unequivocally proven to do so. Often, musculoskeletal restriction and contractures of the hands are a major problem in patients with scleroderma and occupational therapy and exercise goes a long way to helping those patients maintain optimal function.  Most importantly, patients with scleroderma need to be educated about what organ systems should be explored for the development of involvement, and therapy ultimately would be directed at the organ systems involved. There is not a “one size fits all” approach to the treatment of scleroderma.

Dr. Robert Spiera is a rheumatologist and Director of the Vasculitis and Scleroderma Program at Hospital for Special Surgery. He is the principal investigator in several clinical trials and observational studies focusing on scleroderma and vasculitis.

Topics: Rheumatology
The information provided in this blog by HSS and our affiliated physicians is for general informational and educational purposes, and should not be considered medical advice for any individual problem you may have. This information is not a substitute for the professional judgment of a qualified health care provider who is familiar with the unique facts about your condition and medical history. You should always consult your health care provider prior to starting any new treatment, or terminating or changing any ongoing treatment. Every post on this blog is the opinion of the author and may not reflect the official position of HSS. Please contact us if we can be helpful in answering any questions or to arrange for a visit or consult.

10 Comments

    1. Hello- If you would like to consider Hospital for Special Surgery for treatment, please reach out to our Patient Referral Service at 888-720-1982. Best of luck!

  1. Dear Dr Spiera,

    I have been ill for years.
    A discoloration to my forehead has now extended downward and most disturbing is now indented as well!
    I came across your site while trying to find out why this is happening.

    Are you taking new patients? Can you possibly see me at you scleroderma center. I have called the referral center however the Rheumatologists recommended did not specialize in scleroderma.

    I was told by a PA that I had en coupe de sabre or linear scleroderma but offered no treatment plan!
    I suffer from severe head aches and have white matter lesions in the periventricular region of the left frontal lobe of my brain

    The appearance of my forehead is getting worse and I am fearful I will soon look like I have a major deformity. Not to mention what is going good on with my skull and brain. I also have noticed rapid, recent changes to my musculoskeletal system as well as pain in my hands.

    I do not know what to do at this point – you are basically my only shot at understanding what is actively happening to me.

    Tjank you for any insight you can provide.

    Sincerely,
    Joan

    1. Hi Joan — If you reach out to our Patient Referral Service at 888-720-1982 they will be able to determine if there is an appropriate physician for you to consider. Best of luck!

    1. Hi Phil, thank you for reaching out. Dr. Robert Spiera, Rheumatologist, says: “There is no specific diet known to improve the underlying disease process in scleroderma. In inflammatory diseases in general, there has been some suggestion that omega-3 fatty acids may have an anti-inflammatory effect, but that has not been proven to be of benefit in scleroderma specifically. Nutrition, however, is a major issue in scleroderma patients who at times struggle with GI symptoms. Trying to maintain adequate caloric intake is crucial, adhering to general principles of maintaining a well-balanced diet. Many patients with scleroderma struggle with acid reflux and avoidance of tobacco and alcohol, as well as trying to identify foods that specifically exacerbate the problem can be helpful at improving those reflux symptoms. Others may find that they have some component of lactose intolerance which can exacerbate some of their lower GI symptoms. It is helpful to make note of what foods are best tolerated and allow you to have adequate total caloric intake in a balanced fashion.”

  2. SALVE DR.SPIERA,
    MI PRESENTO…MI CHIAMO BL? MANUELA HO 29 ANNI E VIVO A TARANTO(ITALY).
    CIRCA UN ANNO FA MI E” STATA DIAGNOSTICATA IL FENOMENO DI RAYNAUD ACROASFITTICO E LESIONI PRE ULCERATIVE DELLE ACROSEDI IN SCLEROSI SISTEMICA.INSUFFICIENZA MITRALICA DI GRADO LIEVE. OVERLAP CLINICO CON LA SINDROME DI SJOGREN.
    ANA>1/160
    ENA: ANTI Ro 1.7
    LA TERAPIA CHE SEGUO ATTUALMENTE ? LA SEGUENTE.
    TRACLEER 125 1 CP X 2
    CARDIOASPIRINA 1 CP DOPO PRANZO
    ILOPROST 3 GIORNI DI INFUSIONE AL MESE
    ADALAT CRONO DA 20 MG 1 CP AL MATTINO
    PLAQUENIL 1 CP X 2
    MEDROL 16:1/4 DI CP A COLAZIONE
    ANTRA 20, 1 CP PRIMA DI COLAZIONE
    OSTIDIL 1 CP DOPO PRANZO TUTTI I GIORNI.
    A DISTANZA DI UN ANNO NON VEDO MIGLIORAMENTI IN QUANTO LA PELLE DELLE MANI E DEI PIEDI DIVENTA SEMPRE PI? DURA E HO L INSORGENZA DELLE ULCERE SEMPRE PI? FREQUENTI.
    VOLEVO CHIEDERLE SE LA TERAPIA CHE SEGUO ? ADATTA E SE POSSIBILE SAREI DISPOSTA A ESSERE SEGUITA DA LEI.
    IN ATTESA DI UN SUO RISCONTRO
    GRAZIE PER LA DISPONIBILIT?
    DISTINTI SALUTI
    MANUELA

    HELLO DR.SPIERA ,
    ABOUT ME … MY NAME IS BLE MANUELA 29 YEARS AND I HAVE TO LIVE Taranto (ITALY) .
    ABOUT A YEAR AGO AND ME ” BEEN DIAGNOSED THE PHENOMENON Raynaud ACROASFITTICO AND INJURIES OF PRE ulcerative ACROSEDI SYSTEMIC SCLEROSIS .INSUFFICIENZA mitral SCLEROSIS IN GRADE MINOR . CLINICAL OVERLAP WITH Sjogren”s syndrome .
    ANA > 1/160
    ENA : ANTI Ro 1.7
    THERAPY THAT FOLLOW THIS MOMENT is .
    TRACLEER 125 CP 1 X 2
    Cardioaspirin 1 CP AFTER LUNCH
    Iloprost 3 DAYS INFUSION OF THE MONTH
    Adalat CHRONO 20 MG 1 CP IN THE MORNING
    Plaquenil CP 1 X 2
    Medrol 16:1 / 4 OF A BREAKFAST CP
    ANTRA 20 , 1 CP BEFORE BREAKFAST
    OSTIDIL 1 CP AFTER LUNCH DAILY .
    A DISTANCE OF ONE YEAR I CAN NOT WAIT IMPROVEMENTS SINCE THE SKIN OF HANDS AND FEET LONG AND I HAVE BECOME MORE AND MORE THE ONSET OF ULCERS MORE AND MORE FREQUENTLY .
    I wanted to ask IF YOU FOLLOW THE TREATMENT is SUITED AND IF POSSIBLE I WOULD BE WILLING TO BE FOLLOWED BY YOURSELF.
    WAITING FOR HIS FEEDBACK
    THANK YOU FOR AVAILABILITY
    Regards
    MANUELA

    1. Hi Manuela, thank you for reaching out. If you wish to seek consultation at HSS, please contact the International Center at 212-606-1186 or by email at international@hss.edu for further assistance.

  3. Gostei das informa??es mas gostaria de fazer contato com outras pessoas que estejam tratando esclerodermia para troca de informa??es e motiva??es m?tua ….Minha mae tem 53 anos e esta tratando esclerodermia…tem sido uma luta a cads dia…abra?os
    Jairo gomes

    1. Estimado Senhor Machado Gomes,

      Conexao com outras pessoas que estejam tratando doenca de escleroderma, para troca de informacoes
      e uma grande fonte de apoio. A rede Internacional de Scleroderma ( https://www.sclero.org/ ) tem Ingles-Portugues
      traducao apoio e recursos.

      Voce pode e-mail Ana Celia Castro ( castro.anacelia@gmail.com ) ou Jacqueline Jacques (jjac7@hotmail.com )
      para mais informacao.

      Si desejam informacao en Ingles referirse a Hospital for Special Surgery ( https://www.hss.edu/sclerodema-vasculitis- center.asp ) tem revistas e recursos adicionales.

      Por favor deixe-me saber si tem uma pergunta ou precisa qualquer coisa.

      Obrigada.

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