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A Guide to Working Out When Something Really Hurts

VICE Tonic—April 26, 2018

VICE Tonic featured HSS physical therapist Snehal Patel PT, MPT, SCS, as well as primary care sports medicine physicians Jordan D. Metzl, MD, and Ryan J. Lingor, MD, in an article about how to exercise with certain injuries in order to maintain muscle strength.

For a shoulder injury, Patel recommended starting your exercise with range-of-motion warm-ups, such as pendulum swings or windmills, and modify your routine or take a break from working your shoulders if it doesn't feel right.

Shoulders, unlike other muscle groups, won't loosen up and feel better as your progress through your exercise routine, Dr. Lingor added.

Elbows, wrists, and hands are one area in particular where you can quickly make a bad problem into a worse problem if you try to push through the pain, said Dr. Metzl.

However, if you have a hip or groin injury, Dr. Lingor said that swimming could be a helpful workout.

Read the full article at tonic.vice.com

 

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