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Outsmarting Arthritis: Experts to Discuss Treatment of Hip Pain in Younger Adults

New York—June 14, 2011

 

Outsmarting Arthritis: Experts to Discuss Treatment of Hip Pain in Younger Adults

Preservation Techniques May Prepare Joints for a Longer Battle

Event:             9th Symposium on Joint Preserving and Minimally Invasive Surgery of the Hip co-sponsored by Hospital for Special Surgery and the University of Ottawa Faculty of Medicine.

Increasingly, younger adults with hip pain come to orthopedic surgeons with expectations that newer treatment options will help them avoid long-term disruptions of their active lifestyles. In recent years, hip specialists have been able to slow or reverse the progression of degenerative arthritis, keeping patients active and, in some cases, reducing the need for more extensive surgeries.

To provide orthopedic surgeons with the latest clinical data and opinions on topics related to treating young adults with hip pain, Hospital for Special Surgery, along with the University of Ottawa Faculty of Medicine, will co-host an educational symposium drawing on the expertise of hip specialists and other professionals from around the world.

“Our hope is that, by treating underlying hip disorders and conditions, we may be able to delay the onset or severity of arthritis later in these patients’ lives,” said Dr. Douglas Padgett, chief of the Adult Reconstruction and Joint Replacement Division, chief of Hip Service at Hospital for Special Surgery and co-director of the symposium.

Experts will address arthroscopic techniques that preserve the hip joint as well as less-invasive surgical techniques that can help manage the symptoms of arthritis.

Date:               Thursday, June 16 – Saturday, June 18, 2011

Time:               6:55 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. on Thursday, June 16

                        7:55 a.m. – 4:05 p.m. on Friday, June 17

                        7:55 a.m. – noon on Saturday, June 18

Location:         Thursday, Friday and Saturday:

The Roosevelt Hotel

45 East 45th Street

New York, NY 10017

Highlighted Personnel:             

Douglas E. Padgett, M.D., chief of the Adult Reconstruction and Joint Replacement Division, chief of Hip Service at Hospital for Special Surgery and co-director of Joint Preserving and Minimally Invasive Surgery of the Hip Symposium

Paul E. Beaulé, M.D., head of the Adult Reconstruction Service for the Ottawa Hospital, associate professor at the University of Ottawa and co-director of Joint Preserving and Minimally Invasive Surgery of the Hip Symposium

Bryan T. Kelly, M.D., co-director of the Center for Hip Preservation and sports medicine orthopedic surgeon at Hospital for Special Surgery

Mario Lamontagne, Ph.D., professor of biomechanics and mechanical engineering at University of Ottawa

Michael Leunig, M.D., chief of Hip Surgery at Schulthess Clinic in Zürich, Switzerland

Derek J. McMinn, M.D., hip and knee surgeon at the McMinn Centre and BMI Edgbaston Hospital in Birmingham, U.K.

Ernest L. Sink, M.D., co-director of the Center for Hip Preservation and orthopedic surgeon at Hospital for Special Surgery

Details:            The symposium includes presentations and discussions with some of the world’s top hip specialists, as well as video demonstrations of associated surgical techniques and approaches.

Some faculty will address pre-arthritic concerns – “preservation” of the hip joint to reduce hip pain and to possibly postpone further problems, such as arthritis. Others will address arthritis management and less-invasive surgical techniques.

                        “It is no longer the case that a patient with arthritis will need major hip surgery that will leave them inactive for months,” noted Dr. Paul Beaulé, head of the Adult Reconstruction Service for the Ottawa Hospital, associate professor at the University of Ottawa and co-director of the symposium. “Knowledge gained from decades of hip replacement, along with newer imaging and diagnostic techniques, have helped us to revolutionize hip surgery so that patients with arthritis may regain function as quickly as possible.”

Highlighted discussions and debates are grouped below based on their focus: Preservation (pre-arthritic and arthroscopic techniques, and hip resurfacing) or Management (post-arthritic techniques including hip replacement.)

·         Hip pain, impingement and treatment decisions (Preservation)

o        Mechanical Causes of Osteoarthritis: Dysplasia vs. Impingement: Michael Leunig, M.D., chief of Hip Surgery at Schulthess Clinic in Zürich, Switzerland

Thursday, June 16, 8:10 a.m. – 8:20 a.m.

o        Classifying the Femoroacetabular Impingement (FAI) Deformities: Martin Beck, M.D., orthopedic surgeon at University of Rostock in Rostock, Germany

Thursday, June 16, 9:10 a.m. – 9:20 a.m.

o        Are Patients Doing Better with FAI Treatment?: Thomas Byrd, M.D., founder of Nashville Sports Medicine and Orthopaedic Center in Nashville, Tenn.

Thursday, June 16, 10:25 a.m. – 10:35 a.m.

o        An Algorithmic Approach to Mechanical Hip Pain: Bryan T. Kelly, M.D., co-director of the Center for Hip Preservation and sports medicine orthopedic surgeon at Hospital for Special Surgery

Thursday, June 16, 10:35 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.

o        Role of Navigation in FAI: Anil S. Ranawat, M.D., sports medicine orthopedic surgeon at Hospital for Special Surgery

Thursday, June 16, 1:32 p.m. – 1:39 p.m.

o        Getting Started with Impingement Surgery: Ernest L. Sink, M.D., co-director of the Center for Hip Preservation and orthopedic surgeon at Hospital for Special Surgery

Friday, June 17, 8:00 a.m. – 8:10 a.m.

·         Newest technologies: helping us better understand what works, what doesn’t and why (Management)

o        Magnetic Resonance Imaging of a Metal-on-Metal Joint Arthroplasty: Hollis Potter, M.D., chief of the Division of Magnetic Resonance Imaging and director of research in the Department of Radiology and Imaging at Hospital for Special Surgery

Saturday, June 18, 8:10 a.m. – 8:20 a.m.

o        How Can 3-D Motion Analysis Help Us Better Understand Our Results?: Mario Lamontagne, Ph.D., professor of biomechanics and mechanical engineering at University of Ottawa

Saturday, June 18, 8:55 a.m. – 9:05 a.m.

o        Navigation and Robotics in Total Hip Replacement: Douglas E. Padgett, M.D., chief of the Adult Reconstruction and Joint Replacement Division, chief of Hip Service at Hospital for Special Surgery and Co-Director of Symposium

Saturday, June 18, 9:25 p.m. – 9:35 p.m.

·         Clinical outcomes after hip resurfacing (Preservation)

o        40-Year Perspective on Hip Resurfacing: Is There Reason to Panic?: Harlan C. Amstutz, M.D., founding director of Joint Replacement Institute at St. Vincent Medical Center and professor emeritus of Orthopaedic Surgery, UCLA in Los Angeles, Calif.

Friday, June 17, 11:35 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.

o        Resurfacing in Its Second Decade: Is It Going to Age Nicely?: Derek J. McMinn, M.D., hip and knee surgeon at the McMinn Centre and BMI Edgbaston Hospital in Birmingham, U.K.

Friday, June 17, 3:40 p.m. – 3:50 p.m.

o        Activity Level After Hip Resurfacing: Is it Better and Why Should We Care?: Robert L. Barrack, M.D., chief of staff for orthopedic surgery at Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis, Missouri

Saturday, June 18, 8:20 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.

·         Resurfacing vs. total hip replacement (Management)

o        When is Total Hip Replacement the Best Option?: Donald S. Garbuz, M.Sc., M.D., hip and knee surgeon at University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada

Thursday, June 16, 2:25 p.m. – 2:35 p.m.

o        What Does Retrieval Analysis Tell Us?: Patricia Campbell, Ph.D., director of the Implant Retrieval Lab at the J. Vernon Luck Orthopaedic Research Center at UCLA, Los Angeles, Calif.

Friday, June 17, 3:10 p.m. – 3:20 p.m.

o        Clinical Outcome of Total Hip Replacement After Failed Hip Resurfacing: Paul E. Beaulé, M.D., head of the Adult Reconstruction Service for the Ottawa Hospital, associate professor at the University of Ottawa and co-director of Symposium

Saturday, June 18, 8:30 a.m. – 8:40 a.m.

·         Ceramic vs. metal hip replacements (Management)

o        Ceramic on Ceramic: Too Unpredictable to Use It Regularly: Edwin P. Su, M.D., hip and knee surgeon, Hospital for Special Surgery; William L. Walter, Ph.D., hip and knee surgeon at Sydney Hip and Knee Surgeons, North Sydney, Australia

Friday, June 17, 9:05 a.m. – 9:15 a.m.

o        Metal on Metal: Is This the End?: Michael Tanzer, M.D., associate surgeon-in-chief and vice chair of Clinical Surgery at McGill University Health Centre, Montréal, Canada; Henri Migaud, M.D., orthopedic surgeon at CHU Lille, Lille, France

Friday, June 17, 9:15 a.m. – 9:25 a.m.

 

 

For the complete program, please follow the link: http://cmetracker.net/HSS/files/Brochures/605941.pdf

 

 

About HSS | Hospital for Special Surgery
HSS is the world’s leading academic medical center focused on musculoskeletal health. At its core is Hospital for Special Surgery, nationally ranked No. 1 in orthopedics (for the ninth consecutive year) and No. 3 in rheumatology by U.S.News & World Report (2018-2019). Founded in 1863, the Hospital has one of the lowest infection rates in the country and was the first in New York State to receive Magnet Recognition for Excellence in Nursing Service from the American Nurses Credentialing Center four consecutive times. The global standard total knee replacement was developed at HSS in 1969. An affiliate of Weill Cornell Medical College, HSS has a main campus in New York City and facilities in New Jersey, Connecticut and in the Long Island and Westchester County regions of New York State. In 2017 HSS provided care to 135,000 patients and performed more than 32,000 surgical procedures. People from all 50 U.S. states and 80 countries travelled to receive care at HSS. In addition to patient care, HSS leads the field in research, innovation and education. The HSS Research Institute comprises 20 laboratories and 300 staff members focused on leading the advancement of musculoskeletal health through prevention of degeneration, tissue repair and tissue regeneration. The HSS Global Innovation Institute was formed in 2016 to realize the potential of new drugs, therapeutics and devices. The culture of innovation is accelerating at HSS as 130 new idea submissions were made to the Global Innovation Institute in 2017 (almost 3x the submissions in 2015). The HSS Education Institute is the world’s leading provider of education on the topic on musculoskeletal health, with its online learning platform offering more than 600 courses to more than 21,000 medical professional members worldwide. Through HSS Global Ventures, the institution is collaborating with medical centers and other organizations to advance the quality and value of musculoskeletal care and to make world-class HSS care more widely accessible nationally and internationally.

 

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