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Advances in Diagnosis and Treatment of Hip Pain are Focus at 2009 International Society for Hip Arthroscopy Meeting Hosted by Hospital for Special Surgery

Difficulties in diagnosing hip pain affect professional athletes and everyday active people alike

NEW YORK—September 25, 2009

Recent advances in diagnostic imaging techniques and hip arthroscopy procedures are giving physicians and surgeons better tools with which to treat hip pain. The 2009 International Society for Hip Arthroscopy meeting, hosted by Hospital for Special Surgery in New York, brings together leading surgeons from all over the world to take an in-depth look at hip arthroscopy and its potential benefits.

"This inaugural meeting by the International Society for Hip Arthroscopy will concentrate on the rapidly changing field of arthroscopic hip surgery," said Robert Buly, M.D., attending orthopedic surgeon at Hospital for Special Surgery and course director of the ISHA meeting. "Presentations will be focused on the current research and outcomes data associated with both common and new procedures."

Hip arthroscopy, a minimally invasive treatment option, is an alternative for some patients over open, invasive surgery. Through a few tiny incisions, doctors are able to insert tools to trim bone or repair cartilage. Previously, surgeons only had the option of opening up the entire hip with a large incision and dislocating the hip to access the joint. This procedure can be used to treat patients with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), also known as hip impingement, where there is a change in the bony form of the hip joint causing a decreased range of motion and pain, damage to the cartilage within the hip joint, such as labral tears, and other conditions.

It is not uncommon for hip pain due to hip impingement or labral tears to be misdiagnosed. The difficulty in diagnosing the underlying causes of hip pain doesn't affect only professional athletes like Alex Rodriguez, Carlos Delgado or Mike Lowell, who have been in the news for their injuries and subsequent treatment, but week-end warriors and everyday active individuals as well. Hospital for Special Surgery's Center for Hip Preservation uses the latest imaging technology and arthroscopic techniques to provide those experiencing hip pain with proper diagnosis and treatment.

Research highlights include outcomes data presented by Special Surgery's Dr. Buly and Bryan Kelly, M.D., co-director of the Center for Hip Preservation at Hospital for Special Surgery and a study by Marc Philippon, M.D., of the Steadman Hawkins Research Foundation in Colorado, on how to assess the ability of a patient to return to sports after arthroscopy. Two imaging advances, one on techniques that allow greater visibility into the hip joint and a second on a method that may identify the earliest onset of arthritis will be presented, as well as a British study on siblings that addresses the genetics underlying hip impingement.

The meeting will take place in New York on October 9 and 10, 2009 at the Roosevelt Hotel on Madison Avenue and 45th Street.

See the full program of the 2009 International Society for Hip Arthroscopy meeting. Learn more about Hospital for Special Surgery's Center for Hip Preservation.

 

About HSS | Hospital for Special Surgery
HSS is the world’s leading academic medical center focused on musculoskeletal health. At its core is Hospital for Special Surgery, nationally ranked No. 1 in orthopedics (for the eighth consecutive year) and No. 3 in rheumatology by U.S. News & World Report (2017-2018). Founded in 1863, the Hospital has one of the lowest infection rates in the country and was the first in New York State to receive Magnet Recognition for Excellence in Nursing Service from the American Nurses Credentialing Center four consecutive times. The global standard total knee replacement was developed at HSS in 1969. An affiliate of Weill Cornell Medical College, HSS has a main campus in New York City and facilities in New Jersey, Connecticut and in the Long Island and Westchester County regions of New York State. In 2017 HSS provided care to 135,000 patients and performed more than 32,000 surgical procedures. People from all 50 U.S. states and 80 countries travelled to receive care at HSS. In addition to patient care, HSS leads the field in research, innovation and education. The HSS Research Institute comprises 20 laboratories and 300 staff members focused on leading the advancement of musculoskeletal health through prevention of degeneration, tissue repair and tissue regeneration. The HSS Global Innovation Institute was formed in 2016 to realize the potential of new drugs, therapeutics and devices. The culture of innovation is accelerating at HSS as 130 new idea submissions were made to the Global Innovation Institute in 2017 (almost 3x the submissions in 2015). The HSS Education Institute is the world’s leading provider of education on the topic on musculoskeletal health, with its online learning platform offering more than 600 courses to more than 21,000 medical professional members worldwide. Through HSS Global Ventures, the institution is collaborating with medical centers and other organizations to advance the quality and value of musculoskeletal care and to make world-class HSS care more widely accessible nationally and internationally.

 

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