Plasma 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Levels in Operative Patella Fractures

Keith R. Reinhardt MD,
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY
Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY
Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA

Lionel E. Lazaro MD,
Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY
NewYork Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY

Ben-Paul Umunna BA,
Weill MEdical College of Cornell University, New York, NY
NewYork Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY

Michael B. Cross MD,
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY
Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY


David L. Helfet, MD

David L. Helfet, MD

Attending Orthopedic Surgeon, Hospital for Special Surgery
Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery, Weill Cornell Medical College

Joseph M. Lane, MD

Joseph M. Lane, MD

Attending Orthopaedic Surgeon, Hospital for Special Surgery
Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery, Weill Cornell Medical College

Dean G. Lorich, MD

Dean G. Lorich, MD

Associate Director of Orthopaedic Trauma Service, Hospital for Special Surgery
Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery, Weill Cornell Medical College

Abstract

Background

Patella fractures have not traditionally been considered “fragility” fractures.

Questions/Purpose

The purpose of this study was to examine the demographic patterns (age and gender distribution) and plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels of a cohort of patients with operative patella fractures.

Patients and Methods

Medical records were reviewed on all consecutive patients presenting to our institution with operative patella fractures from 2003 to 2009. Seventy-eight operative patella fractures (25 male, 53 female) were identified with a mean age of 58 years (range, 22–89 years).

Results

The majority of patients with patella fractures in this series were females over the age of 50 years who sustained low-energy falls from a standing height or less. Twenty-four patients (80%) had vitamin D insufficiency or deficiency at the time of injury. For 68 patients (87%), the patella fracture represented their first fracture. Patients with known osteoporosis risk factors did not have higher rates of vitamin D insufficiency/deficiency.

Conclusions

The age and gender distribution, as well as the prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency/deficiency, of operative patella fractures, suggest that these patients likely have abnormal vitamin D levels and should undergo a metabolic bone work-up.

This article appears in HSS Journal: Volume 9, Number 1.
View the full article at springerlink.com.

About the HSS Journal

HSS Journal, an academic peer-reviewed journal published three times a year, February, July and October. The Journal accepts and publishes peer reviewed articles from around the world that contribute to the advancement of the knowledge of musculoskeletal diseases and disorders.

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