MRI After Patellofemoral Replacement: the Component–Bone Interface and Rotational Alignment

Thomas J. Heyse, MD
Department of Orthopedics and Rheumatology, University Hospital Marburg, Germany

Jens Figiel, MD
Department of Radiology, University Hospital Marburg, Germany

Ulrike Hähnlein
Department of Orthopedics and Rheumatology, University Hospital Marburg, Germany

Nina Timmesfeld, MSc
Institute for Medical Biometry and Epidemiology, University Hospital Marburg, Germany

Markus D. Schofer, MD
Department of Orthopedics and Rheumatology, University Hospital Marburg, Germany

Susanne Fuchs-Winkelmann, MD
Department of Orthopedics and Rheumatology, University Hospital Marburg, Germany

Turgay Efe, MD
Department of Orthopedics and Rheumatology, University Hospital Marburg, Germany


Abstract

Background

In an earlier paper, it was shown that tailored magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows for reproducible analysis of the preserved knee joint structures after patellofemoral replacement (PFR).

Purposes

This pilot study investigates to what degree MRI could produce reliable assessment of the implant–bone interface of femoral and patellar components and rotational alignment following PFR.

Methods

MRI tailored for reduction of metallic artefacts was performed in seven patients who had undergone PFR. Two independent investigators evaluated the implant–bone interface at femoral and patellar components and the rotational alignment of the femoral component. They also assessed their degree of confidence in evaluation using a five-point scale. The inter-observer reliability was determined.

Results

Implant-induced MRI artefact was barely observed and there was no interference with component–bone interface evaluation. There was excellent inter-observer reliability, inter-observer agreement, and confidence for the implant–bone interface at femoral and patellar components and for rotational alignment. The applied score for the interface was found to be reliable.

Conclusion

Tailored MRI allows reproducible analysis of the implant–bone interface and of rotational alignment of the femoral component in patients who have had PFR. It might prove helpful in the assessment of painful PFR.

This article appears in HSS Journal: Volume 9, Number 2.
View the full article at springerlink.com.

About the HSS Journal

HSS Journal, an academic peer-reviewed journal published three times a year, February, July and October. The Journal accepts and publishes peer reviewed articles from around the world that contribute to the advancement of the knowledge of musculoskeletal diseases and disorders.

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