Outcome of Total Knee Arthroplasty After High Tibial Osteotomy

Does Malalignment Jeopardize the Results when Using a Posterior-Stabilized Arthroplasty?

Philippe Hernigou, MD
Hospital Henri Mondor, University Paris East, France

Pascal Duffiet, MD
Hospital Henri Mondor, University Paris East, France

Didier Julian, MD
Hospital Henri Mondor, University Paris East, France

Issac Guissou, MD
Hospital Henri Mondor, University Paris East, France

Alexandre Poignard, MD
Hospital Henri Mondor, University Paris East, France

Charles Henri Flouzat-Lachaniette, MD
Hospital Henri Mondor, University Paris East, France

Abstract

Background

The controversy regarding the outcome of total knee arthroplasties after high tibial osteotomy may relate to malalignment secondary to overcorrection after high tibial osteotomy (HTO) [1, 2] and to the type of arthroplasty itself (posterior-stabilized arthroplasty or posterior cruciate ligament-retaining prosthesis).

Questions/Purpose

We asked two questions: (1) Would a posterior-stabilized arthroplasty provide sufficient constrain and improve pain and function in patients with severe malalignment due to a previous HTO? (2) Will malalignment of the previous HTO jeopardize the long-term results of a total knee reconstruction with a posterior-stabilized implant?

Patients and Methods

We retrospectively reviewed 25 posterior-stabilized TKAs in 25 patients with severe valgus deformity after HTO (ranging from 10° to 20° of valgus) and compared the results with a series of matched 25 posterior-stabilized TKAs in 25 patients with normocorrection after HTO ranging from 5° of valgus to 5° of varus. Clinical, operative, and radiographic data were reviewed. Minimum follow-up was 10 years after the arthroplasty (average, 15 years; range, 1020 years).

Results

All the knees had standard posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty implants. Patients with an overcorrected HTO were more likely to require a soft tissue release to balance the knee. However, Average Knee Society and Function Score improved, respectively, from 48 to 85 and from 50 to 90 points in the severely overcorrected group, versus, respectively, 50 to 89 and 52 to 97 in the normocorrected group, but the range of mobility was superior for patients with normal alignment. Fifteen-year survivorship after the arthroplasty comparison showed no significant difference between the two groups (one revision in each group).

Conclusions

Patients with an overcorrected HTO are more likely to require a soft tissue release to balance the knee. However, both groups show improvements in function and pain. With a posterior-stabilized arthroplasty, the degree of deformity has no impact on the longevity of the TKA.

This article appears in HSS Journal: Volume 9, Number 2.
View the full article at springerlink.com.

About the HSS Journal

HSS Journal, an academic peer-reviewed journal published three times a year, February, July and October. The Journal accepts and publishes peer reviewed articles from around the world that contribute to the advancement of the knowledge of musculoskeletal diseases and disorders.

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