Ideal Femoral Head Size in Total Hip Arthroplasty Balances Stability and Volumetric Wear

Michael B. Cross, MD
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Hospital for Special Surgery

Denis Nam, MD
Department of Orthopaedics Surgery, Hospital for Special Surgery
Weill Medical College of Cornell University


David J. Mayman, MD

Assistant Attending Orthopedic Surgeon, Hospital for Special Surgery
Clinical Co-Director, Computer Assisted Surgery (CAS) Center, Hospital for Special Surgery
Assistant Professor in Orthopedic Surgery, Weill Cornell Medical College

Abstract

Background 
Over the last several years, a trend towards increasing femoral head size in total hip arthroplasty to improve stability and impingement free range of motion has been observed.

Purpose 
The specific questions we sought to answer in our review were: (1) What are the potential advantages and disadvantages of metal-on-metal, ceramic-on-ceramic, and metal-on-polyethylene bearings? (2) What is effect that femoral head size has on joint kinematics? (3) What is the effect that large femoral heads have on bearing surface wear?

Methods 
A PubMed search and a review of 2012 Orthopaedic Research Society abstracts was performed and articles were chosen that directly answered components of the specific aims and that reported outcomes with contemporary implant designs or materials.

Results 
A review of the literature suggests that increasing femoral head size decreases the risk of postoperative dislocation and improves impingement free range of motion; however, volumetric wear increases with large femoral heads on polyethylene and increases corrosion of the stem in large metal-on-metal modular total hip arthroplasty (THA); however, the risk of potentially developing osteolysis or adverse reactions to metal debris respectively is still unknown. Further, the effect of large femoral heads with ceramic-on-ceramic THA is unclear, due to limited availability and published data.

Conclusions 
Surgeons must balance the benefits of larger head size with the increased risk of volumetric wear when determining the appropriate head size for a given patient.

This article appears in HSS Journal: Volume 8, Number 3.
View the full article at springerlink.com.

About the HSS Journal

HSS Journal, an academic peer-reviewed journal published three times a year, February, July and October. The Journal accepts and publishes peer reviewed articles from around the world that contribute to the advancement of the knowledge of musculoskeletal diseases and disorders.


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