Hip Arthroscopy Update

HSS Journal


Robert L. Buly, MD

Robert L. Buly, MD

Associate Attending Orthopaedic Surgeon, Hospital for Special Surgery
Associate Professor of Clinical Orthopedic Surgery, Weill Cornell Medical College

Bryan T. Kelly, MD

Bryan T. Kelly, MD

Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, Hospital for Special Surgery
Associate Attending Orthopedic Surgeon, Hospital for Special Surgery
Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, Weill Cornell Medical College

Abstract
The management of hip injuries in the athlete has evolved significantly in the past few years with the advancement of arthroscopic techniques. The application of minimally invasive surgical techniques has facilitated relatively rapid returns to sporting activity in recreational and elite athletes alike. Recent advancements in both hip arthroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging have elucidated several sources of intraarticular pathology that result in chronic and disabling hip symptoms. Many of these conditions were previously unrecognized and thus, left untreated. Current indications for hip arthroscopy include management of labral tears, osteoplasty for femoroacetabular impingement, thermal capsulorrhaphy and capsular plication for subtle rotational instability and capsular laxity, lateral impact injury and chondral lesions, osteochondritis dissecans, ligamentum teres injuries, internal and external snapping hip, removal of loose bodies, synovial biopsy, subtotal synovectomy, synovial chondromatosis, infection, and certain cases of mild to moderate osteoarthritis with associated mechanical symptoms. In addition, patients with long-standing, unresolved hip joint pain and positive physical findings may benefit from arthroscopic evaluation. Patients with reproducible symptoms and physical findings that reveal limited functioning, and who have failed an adequate trial of conservative treatment will have the greatest likelihood of success after surgical intervention. Strict attention to thorough diagnostic examination, detailed imaging, and adherence to safe and reproducible surgical techniques, as described in this review, are essential for the success of this procedure.

This article appears in HSS Journal: Volume 1, Number 1.
View the full article at springerlink.com.


About the HSS Journal
HSS Journal, an academic peer-reviewed journal, is published twice a year, February and September, and features articles by internal faculty and HSS alumni that present current research and clinical work in the field of musculoskeletal medicine performed at HSS, including research articles, surgical procedures, and case reports.

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