Scott A. Rodeo, MD

Dr. Scott Rodeo is a clinician-scientist at Hospital for Special Surgery, with appointments in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery (Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service) and the Research Department (Laboratory for Soft Tissue Research). He is Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at Weill Cornell Medical College and Co-Chief Emeritus of the Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service at Hospital for Special Surgery. He specializes in sports medicine injuries of the knee, shoulder, ankle, and elbow. He also performs arthritis surgery of the knee and shoulder, including joint replacement surgery. He has specific expertise in complex knee reconstruction (including meniscus transplantation, cartilage resurfacing, osteotomy, and ligament reconstruction), treatment of shoulder instability, and rotator cuff tendon repair. His research focuses on the basic biology of tendon and ligament healing, meniscal allograft transplantation, and rotator cuff repair.

Dr. Rodeo cares for elite, professional, and everyday athletes alike. He has been associate team physician of the New York Giants Football Team since 2000. In 2004 and 2008 he served as Team Physician for U.S.A. Olympic Swimming and returned to this position in London for the 2012 games. You can read Dr. Rodeo's blog from the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing at http://olympicsmd.blogspot.com/. You can also read Dr. Rodeo's 2012 US Olympic blog from London at http://www.hssonthemove.com/category/olympics/.

Dr. Rodeo also holds a Board position at Asphalt Green, a community based athletic organization in Manhattan, where he helps to promote injury prevention and healthy living through exercise and health education information to its members. Dr. Rodeo is a former competitive swimmer.

Appointments

Attending Orthopaedic Surgeon, Hospital for Special Surgery
Co-Chief Emeritus, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, Hospital for Special Surgery
Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery, Weill Cornell Medical College
Attending Surgeon (Orthopaedic Surgery), The New York-Presbyterian Hospital
Associate Team Physician, New York Giants Football

Specialty

Subspecialty

Sports Medicine, Knee, Shoulder

Special Expertise

Shoulder Instability
Knee Ligament Injury
Rotator Cuff Injury / Rotator Cuff Disease
Meniscus Transplantation

Awards

"Best Doctors in New York," New York magazine, 2009, 2010, 2011
Excellence in Research Award, American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine, 2004
Finalist, New Investigator’s Recognition Award, Orthopaedic Research Society, 1997
Winner 3M Basic Science Award, American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine, 1996
Lewis Clark Wagner Award for Resident Research, The Hospital for Special Surgery, 1994
Winner, American Orthopaedic Asociation-Zimmer Resident Research Travel Award, 1992

Affiliations

Team Physician, U.S. Olympic Swimming, 2004, 2008
Member, Board of Directors, Asphalt Green

Insurances Accepted

Aetna
Blue Cross HMO POS
Blue Cross PPO
Medicare

If Dr. Rodeo does not participate with your particular insurance plan, you may still have coverage subject to the availability of 'out-of-network' benefits. Please do not hesitate to contact our office if you have questions regarding your insurance coverage.

Education

MD, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York

Residency

Hospital for Special Surgery, New York

Fellowship

Hospital for Special Surgery, New York

Certification

American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery

State Licensure

New York

Scott A. Rodeo, MD has contributed to the following articles on HSS.edu:

Selected Publications

Kawamura S, Ying L, Kim HY, Dynybil C, Rodeo SA. Macrophages accumulate in the early phase of tendon-bone healing. Journal of Orthopaedic Research, 23: 1425-1432, 2005.

Cohen, D., Kawamura, S., Ehteshami, J., Rodeo, S. Indomethacin and celecoxib impair rotator cuff tendon-to-bone healing. American Journal of Sports Medicine, 34: 362-369, 2006.

Rodeo SA, Kawamura S, Kim HJ, Dynybil C, Ying L. Tendon Healing in a Bone Tunnel Differs at the Tunnel Entrance versus the Tunnel Exit: An Effect of Graft-Tunnel Motion? American Journal of Sports Medicine, 34: 1790-1800, 2006.

Fealy S, Rodeo SA, MacGillivray JD, Nixon AJ, Adler RS, Warren RF. Biomechanical evaluation of the relation between number of suture anchors and strength of the bone-tendon interface in a goat rotator cuff model. Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery, 22: 595-602, 2006.

Kelly BT, Potter HG, Deng X, Pearle AD, Turner AS, Warren RF, Rodeo SA. Hydrogel meniscus replacement in the sheep knee: preliminary evaluation of chondroprotective effects. American Journal of Sports Medicine, 35: 43-52, 2007.

Ma CB, Kawamura S, Deng X, Ying L, Rodeo SA. BMP-signaling plays a role in tendon-to-bone healing: A study of rhBMP-2 and noggin. American Journal of Sports Medicine, 35: 597-604, 2007.

Rodeo SA, Potter HG, Kawamura S, Turner AS, Kim HJ, Atkinson BL. Biologic augmentation of rotator cuff tendon healing with use of a mixture of osteoinductive growth factors. J. Bone and Joint Surgery, 89: 2485-97, 2007.

Rodeo SA, Kawamura S, Ma CB, Deng X, Sussmann PS, Hays P, Ying L. The effect of osteoclastic activity on tendon-to-bone healing: An experimental study in rabbits. J. Bone and Joint Surgery, 89: 2250-2259, 2007.

Hays PL, Kawamura S, Deng X, Dagher E, Mithoefer K, Ying L, Rodeo SA. The role of macrophages in early healing of a tendon graft in a bone tunnel: An experimental study in a rat anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction model. J. Bone and Joint Surgery, 90: 565-79, 2008.

Steiner ME, Murray MM, Rodeo SA. Strategies to improve anterior cruciate ligament healing and graft placement. American Journal of Sports Medicine, 36:176-89, 2008. Seeherman HJ,

Archambault JM, Rodeo SA, Turner AS, Zekas L, D'Augusta D, Li XJ, Smith E, Wozney JM. rhBMP-12 accelerates healing of rotator cuff repairs in a sheep model. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 90:2206-19, 2008.

Spalazzi JP, Dagher E, Doty SB, Guo XE, Rodeo SA, Lu HHIn vivo evaluation of a multiphased scaffold designed for orthopaedic interface tissue engineering and soft tissue-to-bone integration. J Biomed Mater Res A. 86:1-12, 2008.

Dagher E, Hays P, Kawamura S, Godin J, Deng X, Rodeo S. Immobilization modulates macrophage accumulation in tendon-bone healing. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, 467: 281-287, 2009.

Moffat KL, Wang IE, Rodeo SA, Lu HH. Orthopedic interface tissue engineering for the biological fixation of soft tissue grafts. Clin Sports Med 28: 157-176, 2009.

For more publications, please see the PubMed listing.

Research Description

Evaluation of the cellular and molecular mechanism of tendon-to-bone healing
Evaluation of novel materials for meniscus replacement
Meniscus tissue engineering

Our laboratory is examining the effect of mechanical load on healing between tendon and bone. The clinical problems that our research addresses include ligament reconstruction using a tendon graft, such as anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and rotator cuff repair in the shoulder. Both of these procedures require secure attachment and healing between tendon and bone. The highly specialized insertion site between soft tissue (tendon, ligament) and bone is not re-created following surgical repair. Our overall goals are to gain further understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanism of tendon-to-bone healing, and the effect of mechanical load on the healing process. We are currently using rodent models of ACL reconstruction, patellar tendon repair, and rotator cuff tendon repair to examine the effect of mechanical loading on tendon biology. We have designed a custom external fixator that can be placed on the animals knee to immobilize the knee joint. This external fixator is interfaced to a custom-designed, computer-controlled loading device that allows daily application of controlled cyclic, axial loading to the tendon-to-bone repair site with the animal under light anesthesia. Findings from these studies will have important implications for post-operative rehabilitation protocols following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and rotator cuff repair.

Clinical Trials

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Dr. Scott Rodeo, Orthopedic Surgeon

Contact Information

Office Locations

Belaire Building
1st Floor
525 East 71st Street
New York, NY 10021

Tel: 212.606.1513
Fax: 212.774.2414

Mailing Address

Hospital for Special Surgery
535 East 70th Street
New York, New York 10021

Elite Athlete Testimonial:


Olympian L. Krayzelburg tells how HSS keeps him on pace and at play.

Patient Testimonials:

Dr. Rodeo in the News: