HSS Doctors Available to Comment on FDA's Approval of Celebrex for Spinal Arthritis, Ankylosing Spondylitis

New York, NY—August 2, 2005 

The Federal Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the Cox-2 inhibitor Celebrex for use in treating a form of arthritis in the spine called ankylosing spondylitis. The disease affects more than 400,000 Americans, typically between the ages of 17 and 35, Pfizer said in a statement. Ankylosing spondylitis can also cause inflammation, pain and stiffness in the shoulders, knees, hips, ribs and feet.

Whether patients are recovering from joint replacement surgery or sports injuries, or suffering from arthritis, osteoarthritis or lupus, they are looking to their healthcare practitioners to help them put this data into perspective and help them make the right treatment decisions.

The following Hospital for Special Surgery doctors are available to comment on ankylosing spondylitis and treatments, including options other than Celebrex:

Theodore R. Fields, MD, FACP
Associate Attending Physician

Available to discuss: Medication alternatives to COX-2 inhibitors, non-medication approaches to arthritis, the COX-2 selective vs non-selective anti-inflammatory agents.

Joseph A. Markenson, MD
Attending Physician

Available to discuss: Current drug studies involving patients with rheumatic disease (rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and lupus), medication alternatives to COX-2s, reasons for withdrawal of Vioxx®, non-medication approaches to arthritis, the COX-2 selective vs non-selective anti-inflammatory agents.

Linda A. Russell, MD
Assistant Attending Physician

Available to discuss: rheumatic disease and orthopedic pharmacology, osteoporosis treatment, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, soft tissue rheumatism

Anne R. Bass, MD
Assistant Attending Physician

Available to discuss: systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, soft tissue rheumatism, lyme disease, vasculitis, inflammatory eye disease

For a discussion of how to reduce the side effects of COX-2 inhibitors - the group of drugs in which Vioxx® and Celebrex® belong - please visit:
http://www.hss.edu/conditions_guidelines-reduce-side-effects-cox2-drugs.asp

For information on the Vioxx® withdrawal and its implications for the management of osteoarthritis for patients, please visit:
http://www.hss.edu/profesional-conditions_13646.asp

About Hospital for Special Surgery
Founded in 1863, Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) is a world leader in orthopedics, rheumatology and rehabilitation. HSS is nationally ranked No. 1 in orthopedics, No. 3 in rheumatology by U.S. News & World Report (2007), and has received Magnet Recognition for Excellence in Nursing Service from the American Nurses Credentialing Center. In the 2006 edition of HealthGrades' Hospital Quality in America Study, HSS received five-star ratings for clinical excellence in its specialties. A member of the NewYork-Presbyterian Healthcare System and an affiliate of Weill Medical College of Cornell University, HSS provides orthopedic and rheumatologic patient care at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital at New York Weill Cornell Medical Center. All Hospital for Special Surgery medical staff are on the faculty of Weill Medical College of Cornell University. The hospital's research division is internationally recognized as a leader in the investigation of musculoskeletal and autoimmune diseases. Hospital for Special Surgery is located in New York City and online at www.hss.edu.

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