When Hitting Down, Should MLB Lower the Mound?

ABCNews—July 15, 2014

Baseball has a problem: Clayton Kershaw, Aroldis Chapman, Felix Hernandez and all the other kings of the hill are just too good.

Ruling with an assortment of big-bending curveballs, sharp sliders and 100 mph heat, a new generation of pitchers has thrown major league hitters into a huge slump.

The spike in strikeouts, the dip in home runs and worries that the game is becoming boring for fans reminds some people of 1968, when Bob Gibson, Denny McLain and their fellow aces dominated.

Back then, the sport came up with a radical solution: The pitcher's mound was lowered from 15 inches to 10 and the strike zone was reduced.

Combined with the addition of four expansion teams, the result was an 11-point increase in the big league batting average in 1969 and a 19 percent rise in runs.

Should baseball drop the mound again?

Dr. David Altchek, the Mets' top physician, said a lower mound "should decrease the force as the body gets less far ahead of the arm."

"As the body falls down the mound, the arm momentarily lags and forces at the elbow cumulate," he said.

Read the full story at ABCnews.com.

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