Center for Brachial Plexus and Traumatic Nerve Injury

About Brachial Plexus and Traumatic Nerve Injury

“Fortunately, new advances in nerve surgery can yield marked improvement in movement and function of the shoulder, elbow, and hand, while simultaneously diminishing pain.”

A traumatic injury of the brachial plexus (nerves that conduct signals to the shoulder, arm and hand) can have devastating consequences, including loss of function and chronic pain for an otherwise healthy, active patient. Fortunately, new advances in nerve surgery can yield marked improvement in movement and function in the shoulder, elbow and hand while simultaneously diminishing pain.  



Figure 1: The nerves of the Brachial Plexus in relation to the spine, ribcage, shoulder, and arm.

Early recognition and treatment of this injury, along with the recent advances that have been made in microsurgical reconstruction, have greatly improved outcomes for patients. Injuries for which restoring function would have been impossible only two decades ago are now being treated with nerve reconstruction, increasing the possibility of a return to an active, productive life. 

The Center for Brachial Plexus and Traumatic Nerve Injury at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) in New York City leads a multidisciplinary approach to expertly treat injuries of the brachial plexus and peripheral nerves. 

Adult and Pediatric Brachial Plexus Injuries

A brachial plexus injury can have a devastating effect on upper limb function. Traumatic brachial plexus injuries, which are most commonly sustained in high-speed motor vehicle accidents or sporting events, are characteristically complete, and affect the sensibility and muscle power of the entire extremity. Read more: Adult and Pediatric Brachial Plexus Injuries

Brachial Plexus Injuries can be Devastating

Injuries to the brachial plexus (nerves that conduct signals to the shoulder, arm, and hand) can have devastating consequences, including loss of function and chronic pain. Fortunately, new advances in nerve surgery can yield marked improvement in movement and function of the shoulder, elbow, and hand, while simultaneously diminishing pain. Read more: Brachial Plexus Injuries: New Advances in Treatment

Thoracic Outlet Syndrome (TOS): An Overview

Thoracic Outlet Syndrome (TOS) is a syndrome that can cause any combination of pain, weakness, numbness, tingling, a cold sensation or, sometimes, a more general type of discomfort in one or both upper limbs. Read more: Thoracic Outlet Syndrome (TOS)

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